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Lifeline Train

Lifeline Train

Lifeline Train

Lifeline Train

Lifeline Train
The Lifeline Train was the most recent event in a string of extremely successful teen service and safety programs that AlaskaMagnificent Scenic Railroad has offered.

The Lifeline Train was created by volunteered support of the Alaska Railroad and the Centers for Disease Control to help train passengers and personnel for Alaska’s mountainous regions. Train travel is unique in that passengers are required to walk the length of the train, children are provided an approved travel pillow and an attending parent is required to feed the children. สล็อตเว็บตรง

The Lifeline Train was conceived by Dr. John Quick, a pediatric pulmonologist from the Boston Massachusetts metropolitan area, and Dr. Herbert Benson, a board-certified opthalmatologist from the Clinic.

The project’s goal was to develop a safe and effective means of travel in Alaska’s mountainous regions. Therefore, the design of the train was based on the principles of stress cancellation and relaxation; this concept being based on the aboard lifeboats of ship that became known for their ability to generate passengers’ euphoric feeling through the application of music and dancing.

The first two trains – the “P practicus” and the “Scorpio” – served as the “gateways” to Alaska’s mountainous regions and became nationalized by the US Government in the 1950s. Unfortunately, the facilities for these trains were closed in 1963 by the end of the Eisenhower’s administration, before the trains could even be privatized. There was a chance, however, that the government would revive the service through the Department of Transportation, and private enterprise was considered. Enterprising individuals and organizationsmountainwideabby full of adrenaline pumped by mountain travelers and the need for comfortable and speedy transfer of manpower and passengers from one point to another.

The initial private venture to create a full scale private passenger train in Alaska was called “Alaska Rail Miles” and was preceded by the equally illustrious Amphic Package Trip, a private passenger train that ran between Vancouver, British Columbia, and Juneau, Alaska in 1970. There were no union representative officers to be found on these trains; this mode of transport was considered temporary, and thus, put into service with only a handful of Pacific Northwest and North West reservations. However, these temporary private passenger services were considered a Class 1 railroad by the CSA (Commutational States Association) and were granted a five year charter.

This left a lasting impression on the minds and souls of skiers and snowboarders, alike. It was difficult, expensive, and had limited footholds, but for many, it provided the only way to get some well-deserved “country” in the heart of alpine majesty. Unfortunately, the spring of 1999 found the private passenger train given up the line, and with only six months to go before the 2006 ski season, the railroad returned to a much more basic route in order to conserve the remaining cash, and prepare for the imminent departure of theNext-day train.

The Juneau and Peninsula passengers, numbering in the several thousands, had to find accommodations in other cities or hike, and the crowds at Prince William Sound were so thick that you could hardly get from downtown to the docks. The track, meanwhile, was picked up and run to the stations by the Alaska Railroad, a joint venture of CSX and the American West that provided the cars with an in-line skate rail which, in theory, followed the existing California and Oregon railroads. practice in handling the myriad of passenger loads was found necessary, and the first such attempt found the cars sliding on the tracks in a heavy rain, fortunately without serious incident.

The next major task was to figure out how to ferry the railroad cars to the Prince William Sound. The cars were too big, too slow, and related mechanical problems were numerous, but a partnership was formed between the railroad and an Arizona boat rental company, and the first yard service was arranged. When everything was in place, the first train ran on November 8, 1999 and since then, no other train has run on the Alaskan Main.

The next two years, 1999 and 2001, found the yard service being provided between Vancouver, BC and Anchorage, AKA the “Pioneer of the North”, but after those two years, the Alaska Railroad had found that the need had grown. By 2002, the need had grown to such an extent that a new, $12.5 million contract was signed between the railroad and the Alaska Port Authority. To help make up for the Lackawaxen River’s size, a barge was barged into the river from the Weymouth fjord with the intent of waiting for a Sendoff Crane or other vessel to deliver the cars to the pier, but the Sending vessel never came.

Lifeline Train